Classics of Architecture
tgphipps:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | German Pavilion | Barcelona Universal Exposition | 1929

tgphipps:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | German Pavilion | Barcelona Universal Exposition | 1929

cartografico:

Álvaro Siza | Banca Borges e Irmao | Vila Do Conde; Portugal | 1986

cartografico:

Álvaro Siza | Banca Borges e Irmao | Vila Do Conde; Portugal | 1986

citizenerich:

Florey Building / James Stirling

A classic from 1971

cartografico:

Fernando Higueras y Antonio Miró | Intituto de Patrimonio Cultural de España (conocido como la corona de espinas) | Madrid; España | 1960-1990

wherearchitectureisfun:

WAÏF: When architecture is just perfect

Instituto del Patrimonio Cultural de España

Fernando Higueras (1930-2008) and Antonio Miró (1931-2011)

Madrid, 1960-1990

Source

jonasgrossmann:

kenzo tange, the hiroshima prefectural office@ arkinetblog

jonasgrossmann:

kenzo tange, the hiroshima prefectural office
@ arkinetblog

tgphipps:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) | S.R. Crown Hall | IIT Campus (Illinois Institute of Technology) | Chicago Illinois | 1950-56

theelegantlyfe:

Photo http://ift.tt/1f7z05j
thelandofmaps:

Expansion of Russia, 1613 - 1914 [3.274 × 1.883]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

thelandofmaps:

Expansion of Russia, 1613 - 1914 [3.274 × 1.883]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

archiveofaffinities:

John Heinrich and George Schipporeit, Lake Point Tower, Typical Floor Plan, First Scheme, Chicago, Illinois, 1967 

archiveofaffinities:

John Heinrich and George Schipporeit, Lake Point Tower, Typical Floor Plan, First Scheme, Chicago, Illinois, 1967 

Chicago Skyline

Chicago Skyline

Lake Point Tower
Lake Point Tower is a high-rise residential building located on a promontory of the Lake Michigan lakefront in downtown Chicago, just north of the Chicago River at 505 North Lake Shore Drive. It is located in the Streeterville neighborhood of the Near North Side community area. It rises somewhat apart from the urban cluster of downtown Chicago in a composition that sets off and punctuates the skyline. The building is also the only skyscraper in downtown Chicago east of Lake Shore Drive.
Development
The architects for Lake Point Tower were John Heinrich and George Schipporeit, working under the firm name of Schipporeit and Heinrich; the two were students of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, who taught at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. Lake Point Tower was completed in 1968, is approximately 645 feet (197 m) tall, and was the tallest apartment building in the world at that time. The project developer was William F. Hartnett, Jr., chairman and founder of Hartnett-Shaw Development Company, which was responsible for more than 260 residential and commercial real estate developments in the United States from 1961–1983.
Architecture
Lake Point Tower was inspired by Mies van der Rohe’s 1922 design for a glass-curtained skyscraper in Berlin. Schipporeit and Heinrich took van der Rohe’s unbuilt office building concept and converted it to a residential building. Lake Point Tower is much taller than van der Rohe’s original project, more regular in form, and its exterior glass curtain wall is tinted; however, the building owes much of its innovative design to the van der Rohe original.
Because of its height and the fact that Lake Point Tower sits on the shore of Lake Michigan, the residential skyscraper had to be designed to withstand high winds. At the center of the building is a triangular core that is 59 feet across in length, which contains nine elevators and three stairwells. This core also holds all of the vertical weight of the building. Because of this, the perimeter pillars on the facade do not need to be large as they only have to bear the horizontal loads.
Radiating from the core are three arms, which form an asymmetrical Y-shaped floor plan. The original plan for the building was to be a four-armed design but was later changed to a three-armed design (120° apart) with the outer walls strategically curved to ensure that the various residents could not see into the other condominiums.The façade of the building is a curtain of bronze-tinted glass framed by gold-anodized aluminum, which reflects the sunlight off of Lake Michigan and looks golden.

Lake Point Tower

Lake Point Tower is a high-rise residential building located on a promontory of the Lake Michigan lakefront in downtown Chicago, just north of the Chicago River at 505 North Lake Shore Drive. It is located in the Streeterville neighborhood of the Near North Side community area. It rises somewhat apart from the urban cluster of downtown Chicago in a composition that sets off and punctuates the skyline. The building is also the only skyscraper in downtown Chicago east of Lake Shore Drive.

Development

The architects for Lake Point Tower were John Heinrich and George Schipporeit, working under the firm name of Schipporeit and Heinrich; the two were students of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, who taught at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. Lake Point Tower was completed in 1968, is approximately 645 feet (197 m) tall, and was the tallest apartment building in the world at that time. The project developer was William F. Hartnett, Jr., chairman and founder of Hartnett-Shaw Development Company, which was responsible for more than 260 residential and commercial real estate developments in the United States from 1961–1983.

Architecture

Lake Point Tower was inspired by Mies van der Rohe’s 1922 design for a glass-curtained skyscraper in Berlin. Schipporeit and Heinrich took van der Rohe’s unbuilt office building concept and converted it to a residential building. Lake Point Tower is much taller than van der Rohe’s original project, more regular in form, and its exterior glass curtain wall is tinted; however, the building owes much of its innovative design to the van der Rohe original.

Because of its height and the fact that Lake Point Tower sits on the shore of Lake Michigan, the residential skyscraper had to be designed to withstand high winds. At the center of the building is a triangular core that is 59 feet across in length, which contains nine elevators and three stairwells. This core also holds all of the vertical weight of the building. Because of this, the perimeter pillars on the facade do not need to be large as they only have to bear the horizontal loads.

Radiating from the core are three arms, which form an asymmetrical Y-shaped floor plan. The original plan for the building was to be a four-armed design but was later changed to a three-armed design (120° apart) with the outer walls strategically curved to ensure that the various residents could not see into the other condominiums.The façade of the building is a curtain of bronze-tinted glass framed by gold-anodized aluminum, which reflects the sunlight off of Lake Michigan and looks golden.

prettyarchitecture:

Sanatorium Zonnestraal

Sanatorium Sunburst is a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients, between 1926 and 1931 is built on the outskirts of the forest in Loosdrecht Hilversum. It was designed by Johannes Duiker, in collaboration with his partner Bernard Bijvoet and engineer Jan Gerko Wiebenga.

The sanatorium consists of a main building with attached two patient pavilions, three workshops and the house maid De Koepel. Overall, the complex is made ​​up of three elongated block volumes, which are parallel to each other. Above is a cross-shaped area in which the medical department, the kitchen and the laundry room are listed.

Duiker designed his buildings as light as possible, with minimal material. This pursuit of a weightless structure typified Duiker themselves as “spiritual economy” because the suggestion of the immaterial (so spiritual) would be aroused by the lightness of his building.

More? Go to Pretty Architecture!
Source tekst: architectenweb Translated by: Pretty Architecture!

archimaps:

Pier Luigi Nervi’s Hangar interior, Orvieto

archimaps:

Pier Luigi Nervi’s Hangar interior, Orvieto

archimaps:

The World Trade Center, Tokyo

archimaps:

The World Trade Center, Tokyo